Marine Science

  • Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).


AP Chemistry

  • Learn about the fundamental concepts of chemistry including structure and states of matter, intermolecular forces, and reactions. You’ll do hands-on lab investigations and use chemical calculations to solve problems.

    Note: Save your lab notebooks and reports; colleges may ask to see them before granting you credit.

    Course Content

    • Unit 1: Atomic Structure and Properties
    • Unit 2: Molecular and Ionic Compound Structure and Properties
    • Unit 3: Intermolecular Forces and Properties
    • Unit 4: Chemical Reactions
    • Unit 5: Kinetics
    • Unit 6: Thermodynamics
    • Unit 7: Equilibrium
    • Unit 8: Acids and Bases
    • Unit 9: Applications of Thermodynamics

Chemistry I Honors

  • While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Chemistry I course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth. In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors-level coursework. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).


AP Environmental Science

  • Explore and investigate the interrelationships of the natural world and analyze environmental problems, both natural and human-made. You’ll take part in laboratory investigations and fieldwork.

    Note: Save your lab notebooks and reports; colleges may ask to see them before granting you credit.

    Skills You'll Learn

    • Explaining environmental concepts and processes

    • Analyzing data, visual representations, and writings

    • Applying quantitative methods in solving problems

    • Proposing a solution for an environmental problem and supporting your idea with evidence

    • Analyzing a research study to identify a hypothesis

    Equivalency and Prerequisites

    College Course Equivalent

    A one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science

    Recommended Prerequisites

    Two years of high school laboratory science, including life science and physical science, along with at least one year of algebra


Anatomy and Physiology Honors

  • While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Anatomy and Physiology course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth. In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors-level coursework. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).


Biology I Honors

  • While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Biology I course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth. In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors-level coursework. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).


Physics I Honors

  • While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Physics I course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth.  In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors-level coursework. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).


Earth Space Science

  • Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).


Biology I

  • Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).


Forensic Science I & II

  • Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).


AP Biology

  • Study the core scientific principles, theories, and processes that govern living organisms and biological systems. You’ll do hands-on laboratory work to investigate natural phenomena.

    Course Content

    • Unit 1: Chemistry of Life
    • Unit 2: Cell Structure and Function
    • Unit 3: Cellular Energetics
    • Unit 4: Cell Communication and Cell Cycle
    • Unit 5: Heredity
    • Unit 6: Gene Expression and Regulation
    • Unit 7: Natural Selection
    • Unit 8: Ecology

Agriscience Foundations 1

  • This course is designed to develop competencies in the areas of agricultural history and the global impact of agriculture; career opportunities; scientific and research concepts; biological and physical science principles; environmental principles; agriscience safety; principles of leadership; and agribusiness, employability, and human relations skills in agriscience.  Laboratory-based activities are an integral part of this course.  These include the safe use and application of appropriate technology, scientific testing, and observation equipment.

    Laboratory investigations that include scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, emerging technologies, tools and equipment, as well as, experimental quality, and safety procedures will be an integral part of this course. Students will interact with materials and primary sources of data or with secondary sources of data to observe and understand the natural world.  Students will develop an understanding of measurement error, and develop the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the data and resulting conclusions. Equipment and supplies will be provided to enhance these hands-on experiences for students.  A minimum of 20% of classroom time will be dedicated to laboratory experiences.

    Planned and Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAE) must be provided through one or more of the following:  (1) foundational career exploration, (2) directed laboratory experience, (3) project ownership/entrepreneurship, (4) cooperative education/internship, (5) School-Based Enterprise, or (6) Service Learning.


AP Computer Science Principles

  • The introduction of AP Computer Science Principles in 2016 was the largest course launch in AP Program history. In 2019, nearly 100,000 students took the AP CSP Exam—more than double the number of exam takers in the course’s first year. In the three years since the course launch, the number of female AP CSP students has far outpaced overall growth, with an increase of 136%.

    AP Computer Science Principles introduces students to the foundational concepts of the field and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world.

    The AP Computer Science Principles course complements AP Computer Science A by teaching the foundational concepts of computer science as it aims to broaden participation in the study of computer science. The AP Computer Science A course focuses on computing skills related to programming in Java.

     

    Computer Science A

    Computer Science Principles

    Curricular Focus

    Problem solving and object-oriented programming

    Big ideas of computer science (including algorithms and programming)

    Programming Language

    Java

    Teachers choose the programming language

    End-of-Course Exam Experience

    Multiple-choice (single-select)

    Free-response questions

    Multiple-choice (single- and multiple-select) questions, some related to a reading passage about a computing innovation

    Create performance task administered by the teacher; students submit digital artifacts

Teachers

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