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World History & World History Honors

  • World History 9-12 Course - The grade 9-12 World History course consists of the following content area strands:  World History, Geography and Humanities.  This course is a continued in-depth study of the history of civilizations and societies from the middle school course and includes the history of civilizations and societies of North and South America.  Students will be exposed to historical periods leading to the beginning of the 21st Century.  So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events from ancient and classical civilizations.


AP Human Geography

  • AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012). The course is equivalent to an introductory college-level course in human geography.

    RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITES

    There are no prerequisites for AP Human Geography. Students should be able to read college-level texts and write grammatically correct, complete sentences.

    The course content is organized into seven commonly taught units, which have been arranged in the following suggested, logical sequence:

    Unit 1: Thinking Geographically

    Unit 2: Population and Migration Patterns and Processes 

    Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Processes 

    Unit 4: Political Patterns and Processes

    Unit 5: Agriculture and Rural Land-Use Patterns and Processes

    Unit 6: Cities and Urban Land-Use Patterns and Processes

    Unit 7: Industrial and Economic Development Patterns and Processes


African-American History

  • African-American History - The grade 9-12 African-American History course consists of the following content area strands: World History, American History, Geography, Humanities, Civics, and Government. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of the chronological development of African Americans by examining the political, economic, social, religious, military and cultural events that affected the cultural group. Content will include, but is not limited to, West African heritage, the Middle Passage and Triangular Trade, the African Diaspora, significant turning points and trends in the development of African American culture and institutions, enslavement and emancipation, the Abolition, Black Nationalist, and Civil Rights movements, major historical figures and events in African-American history, and contemporary African-American affairs.


AP World History

  • In AP World History: Modern, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from 1200 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change. The course provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation.

    RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITES

    There are no prerequisites for AP World History: Modern. Students should be able to read a college-level textbook and write grammatically correct, complete sentences.

    The course content is organized into commonly taught units of study that provide a suggested sequence for the course. These units comprise the content and conceptual understandings that colleges and universities typically expect students to master to qualify for college credit and/or placement. This content is grounded in themes, which are cross-cutting concepts that build conceptual understanding and spiral throughout the course.

     


Psychology and Sociology

  • Through the study of psychology, students acquire an understanding of and an appreciation for human behavior, behavior interaction and the progressive development of individuals. The content examined in this first introductory course includes major theories and orientations of psychology, psychological methodology, memory and cognition, human growth and development, personality, abnormal behavior, psychological therapies, stress/coping strategies, and mental health.


Law Studies/Comparative Points

  • Law Studies - The grade 9-12 Law Studies course consists of the following content area strands: American History, World History, Geography, Humanities, Economics, and Civics and Government. The primary content for the course pertains to the study of the American legal system as the foundation of American society by examining those laws which have an impact on citizens' lives and an introduction to fundamental civil and criminal justice procedures. Content should include, but is not limited to, the need for law, the basis for our legal system, civil and criminal law, adult and juvenile courts, family and consumer law, causes and consequences of crime, individual rights and responsibilities, and career opportunities in the legal system.


US History

  • United States History (U.S. History) 9-12 Course - The grade 9-12 United States History course consists of the following content area strands:  United States History, Geography, and Humanities.  The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of United States history from Reconstruction to the present day.  Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history.  So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events which occurred before the end of Reconstruction.


AP U.S. History

  • AP U.S. History is an introductory college-level U.S. history course. Students cultivate their understanding of U.S. history from c. 1491 CE to the present through analyzing historical sources and learning to make connections and craft historical arguments as they explore concepts like American and national identity; work, exchange, and technology; geography and the environment; migration and settlement; politics and power; America in the world; American and regional culture; and social structures.

    Course Content

    Influenced by the Understanding by Design® (Wiggins and McTighe) model, this course framework provides a description of the course requirements necessary for student success.

    The AP U.S. History framework is organized into nine commonly taught units of study that provide one possible sequence for the course. As always, you have the flexibility to organize the course content as you like.

     Unit
     Exam Weighting
     Unit 1: Period 1: 1491–1607  4%–6%
     Unit 2: Period 2: 1607–1754  6%–8%
     Unit 3: Period 3: 1754–1800  10%–17%
     Unit 4: Period 4: 1800–1848  10%–17%
     Unit 5: Period 5: 1844–1877  10%–17%
     Unit 6: Period 6: 1865–1898  10%–17%
     Unit 7: Period 7: 1890–1945  10%–17%
     Unit 8: Period 8: 1945–1980  10%–17%
     Unit 9: Period 9: 1980–Present  4%–6%

    Historical Thinking Skills

    The AP U.S. History framework included in the course and exam description outlines distinct skills that students should practice throughout the year—skills that will help them learn to think and act like historians.

     Skill
     Description
     1. Developments and Processes  Identify and explain historical developments and processes.
     2. Sourcing and Situation  Analyze sourcing and situation of primary and secondary sources.
     3. Claims and Evidence in Sources  Analyze arguments in primary and secondary sources.
     4. Contextualization  Analyze the contexts of historical events, developments, or processes.
     5. Making Connections Using historical reasoning processes (comparison, causation, continuity and change), analyze patterns and connections between and among historical developments and processes.
     6. Argumentation  Develop an argument.

Honors U.S. History

  • United States History (U.S. History) 9-12 Course - The grade 9-12 United States History course consists of the following content area strands: United States History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of United States history from Reconstruction to the present day. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events which occurred before the end of Reconstruction.

    Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of the task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.


US Government/Economics

  • United States Government - The grade 9-12 United States Government course consists of the following content area strands: Geography, Civics, and Government. The primary content for the course pertains to the study of government institutions and political processes and their historical impact on American society. Content should include but is not limited to, the functions and purpose of government, the function of the state, the constitutional framework, federalism, separation of powers, functions of the three branches of government at the local, state, and national level, and the political decision-making process.

    Economics- The grade 9-12 Economics course consists of the following content area strands: Economics and Geography. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of the concepts and processes of the national and international economic systems. Content should include but is not limited to, currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the global market and economy, major economic theories and economists, the role and influence of the government and fiscal policies, economic measurements, tools, and methodology, financial and investment markets, and the business cycle.


POS 1041 National Government/Economics Honors

  • Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of Developmental Writing II (ENC0025) and Developmental Reading II (REA0017), or appropriate placement scores.
    American politics: the constitutional basis, structural organization, functions and operations of our national government, emphasizing the relationship of the individual to the government. Lecture: 3 hours.


Student Leadership

  • The Character Development & Leadership Curriculum for High School Student Government/leadership changes students, schools and the FSUS community. Student Leadership improves students' understanding of what character and leadership mean and naturally translates into more effective behavior in our students at FSUS and in life. 

    The FSUS Student Leadership course combines experiential and project-based learning to empower students to make a difference on our campus, community, and world. Through small and large group discussions, team building activities, and community engagement, students will actively pursue topics such as collaborative leadership, leadership styles, ethics, and decision making while exploring the power of risk-taking, communication, and facilitation in leadership.

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